Welcome to DT & Engineering Teaching Resources (Michael Oyebode Limited)

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cropped-dtengineering-logo-square-1.jpgDesign Technology & Engineering Teaching Resources (Michael Oyebode Limited) is the home of quality professional teaching & learning resources dedicated to Design Technology (DT) and Engineering.

In the spirit of the Society for Education and Training’s professional standard on collaboration this website was set up to share ideas with other teachers and educators in the design technology and engineering subject field.

6) Build positive and collaborative relationships with colleagues and learners

20) Contribute to organisational development and quality improvement through collaboration with others

Education and Training Foundation’s Professional Standards

Services:

One Year Membership to all our resources

Access to over 150 resources for one year! Design Technology & Engineering Teaching Resources is the home of quality professional teaching & learning resources dedicated to Design Technology (DT) and Engineering. One Year Membership to all our resources. Have access to all our resources for one year. Receive new resources created within your membership year is also included.

£200.00

6 months Membership to all our resources

Access to over 150 resources for six months! Design Technology & Engineering Teaching Resources is the home of quality professional teaching & learning resources dedicated to Design Technology (DT) and Engineering. 6 months Membership to all our resources. Have access to all our resources for one year. Receive new resources created within your membership 6 months is also included.

£120.00

One Month Membership to all our resources

Access to over 150 resources for 1 month! Design Technology & Engineering Teaching Resources is the home of quality professional teaching & learning resources dedicated to Design Technology (DT) and Engineering. 1 month Membership to all our resources. Have access to all our resources for 1 month. Receive new resources created within your membership month is also included.

£25.00

Once payment is made, you will be mailed the password and you can access the resources here:

Teaching Resources Members

The “teacher led” College Of Teaching. Part 1

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The “teacher led” College Of Teaching. Part 1

Scenes From The Battleground

I’ve been writing recently about how the Chartered College Of Teaching, the new government funded professional body for teachers, is not to be teacher led after all. It has been suggested that, as people change their minds, and plans changed, this is not a big deal. So I thought I’d write here about how integral to this whole project was the idea that any new body be led by teachers.

The politician who first suggested there be a new professional body to replace the GTCE, was Neil Carmichael, then a member of the education select committee. In January 2012 he raised the idea with a number of people interviewed by the committee [my emphasis].

Neil Carmichael: That is a really interesting point that you have just raised about the parallel between teachers and doctors, and indeed lawyers. The one thing that teachers do not have, which the others do have…

View original post 950 more words

10 essential discussions to have in any teacher team.

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10 essential discussions to have in any teacher team.

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Towards the end of last academic year, I wrote a post outlining what might be in a typical school’s development plan:  Here’s your school development plan – no, really, don’t thank me.  All of those ideas are still relevant for next year.  But what about at a departmental level or a year level in primary? Here are 10 discussions that teams should be having – not all at once, obviously, but over time, involving everyone.

1. What’s in the curriculum? Does everyone know the big picture and the details? 

If you’re building a coherent spiral curriculum, you need to know what goes where in time; you need to know which pillars of your curriculum tower are crucial; foundational. You need know how it all fits and why things are where they are.  Not everyone knows – and it’s a mistake to assume they do.  This needs some discussion to…

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The Chartered College of Teaching. Who counts?

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The Chartered College of Teaching. Who counts?

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I want to explore two issues in this post.  Firstly, who and what is the Chartered College of Teaching for?   I am reading a lot of commentary on twitter focusing on its role in giving teachers a voice.  This then fuels the second issue – who should be on the Council leading the College?  It’s a hotly debated topic.

I’m a bit confused about this debate, to be honest.  Isn’t it in the name? Chartered College of Teaching? It’s not the Chartered College of Teachers.  To me, that’s a significant difference.  We already have unions – with vast memberships – giving teachers a voice as teachers and leaders a voice as leaders.   But the College is for teaching – it’s teaching as a profession that needs an independent, professional voice spanning across roles so that teaching has a collective voice in the political landscape.  This, to me, is more than…

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Another note on those Chartered College Of Teaching elections

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Another note on those Chartered College Of Teaching elections

Scenes From The Battleground

Just a quick post here, but something on Twitter reminded me of another problem I’d talked about when the College of Teaching was proposed.

Back when discussions were underway about the Chartered College Of Teaching, one thing I argued for was more controversial than all the others although, of course, even the things that were more clear cut were completely ignored by the non-teachers who set up the Chartered College. This controversial suggestion was that senior managers be treated differently to teachers who weren’t senior managers. I didn’t mean excluded completely. Of course, they should be involved, but I was particularly concerned that the College would end up dominated by headteachers, not the frontline. I thought it vital that there would be some positions, indeed a majority of positions that heads couldn’t run for. I thought the best way of drawing the line would be to have some positions where…

View original post 647 more words