After 100 Years of the Same Teaching Model It’s Time to Throw Out the Playbook

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AFTER 100 YEARS OF THE SAME TEACHING MODEL IT’S TIME TO THROW OUT THE PLAYBOOK

Education Rickshaw

In looking back at my parents’ education in the 1950s and 60s, and my own education in the 1990s and 2000s, I worry sometimes that despite the huge advances that we’ve seen in technology, not much has changed when it comes to how we view learning and how we design learning environments. The transmission model of education is still the name of the game, although in some circles there are signs of its erosion.

I would like to take you on a journey in this post, starting from the 1950s banking model (Freire, 1968) of instructional design, before comparing it to my own schooling experiences as a digital native at the turn of the century. Then, finally, I would like to share my vision for C21 learning, and propose some ways that we can move forward so that we are meeting the needs of today.


When my parents went…

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Classroom culture: high expectations and challenge

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Classroom culture: high expectations and challenge

Class Teaching

Growing a strong classroom culture is the aim of every teacher.  In order for this culture to mature and bear fruit, it must be rooted in challenge and expectations.  In this week’s teaching forum, geography teacher Hannah Townsend shares her reflections on what she has done over the past four years to develop the highest possible standards in her classroom.

Picture2The starting point for Hannah was to separate out expectations and challenge.  She explained that this was problematic as the two are so completely intertwined.  However, after wrestling with the chicken-and-egg nature of the two concepts she decided that her particular culture started with high expectations.  Once established these then allowed her to set and maintain high challenge.

Hannah is a particularly reflective teacher and as well as drawing on her own experience, she read a series of papers that helped her connect the dots between her own practice with the research evidence.  These are included as a bibliography at the end…

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DT & Engineering Blog: Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion Car

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The Dymaxion car was designed by American inventor Buckminster Fuller during the Great Depression and featured prominently at Chicago’s 1933-1934 World’s Fair.

The Dymaxion’s aerodynamic bodywork was designed for increased fuel efficiency and top speed, and its platform featured a lightweight hinged chassis, rear-mounted V8 engine, front-wheel drive (a rare RF layout), and three wheels. With steering via its third wheel at the rear (capable of 90° steering lock), the vehicle could steer itself in a tight circle, often causing a sensation.

dymaxion

More on academic and non-academic subjects

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More on academic and non-academic subjects

Scenes From The Battleground

Yesterday I wrote about what I think makes some subjects “academic” and other subjects, while still worthwhile, not academic. The discussion on Twitter immediately afterwards was particularly helpful in helping me reconsider some points and defend others (although by now it largely seems to have been replaced by various progressives arguing against things I never said).

My original argument was that the use of the word “academic” to describe a subject corresponds to those subjects where mastery of the subject was characterised by further study (e.g. history or maths) and not those subjects where mastery is characterised by some distinct activity or skill (e.g. woodwork, painting or football). I acknowledged grey areas (music and MFL can be taught in either academic or non-academic ways) and emphasised that the difference between academic and non-academic subjects does not lead to a value judgement. I also put forward the view that trying to…

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